Friday, August 29, 2008

Round 1 starts

Just time for a quick report - more detail later.

A total of 54 players have entered the two sections

The Open section is headed by masters Fletcher Baragar, Sam Lipnowski, and Trevor Vincent.
Frequently heard was "I saved a lost position". Among those saying so were Nikouline, Kaptsan (with a draw), Boron.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Clocks

If you have a chess clock, please bring it to the tourney this weekend.

Sunday, August 24, 2008

6th Annual Tournament August 29-31, 2008



6
th Annual Abe Yanofsky Memorial Tournament

This tournament is the signature event of the Manitoba Chess Association. It is named in honour of Abe Yanofsky, the first chess player in the British Commonwealth to be awarded the Grandmaster title.
Mr. Yanofsky, who died in 2000, was a prominent Winnipeg lawyer and city councillor.

Dates: Friday, August 29 to Sunday, August 31, 2008
Location: Riddell Hall, University of Winnipeg
Prize Fund: $ See below
Format: 5 round Swiss System, Two Sections
Open Section
U 1800 Section
Round Times: Friday 7:00 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 10:00 a.m. and 3:30 p.m
Time Control: 30 /90, All/1 (30 moves in 90 minutes / Remainder in 60 minutes) [Note: First round may be G /120 - TBA]
Entry Fee: Entry Fee: $ 60
Juniors (under 18 years of age) - Seniors (over 60 years of age)- $ 50
$ 10 discount for entry by Tuesday, August 5, 2007

Also second and subsequent entries from immediate family members receive $ 10 discount.

Free entry to FIDE Masters or higher (Entry must be paid up front, but will be refunded after completion (playing) of all five rounds)

CFC Membership also required

Anti-draw rules will be in effect (no agreed draws before move 31)

Registration: on site, Friday, August 29 at 6:30 p.m., or in advance -
cheques payable to:
Manitoba Chess Association
c/o Lorne Gibbons
44 Ainsdale Way
Winnipeg, MB R2C 4B4

or see Lorne Gibbons on Tuesday nights at the TNT tournaments.

Prizes: Prizes:
Open Section: 1st $ 750 , 2nd $ 500, 3rd $ 300
Top A Class - $ 250, 175, 75

U 1800 Section 1st $ 250, 2nd $ 150
Top U1600 $ 200, $ 100
Top U1400 $ 125, 75, 50

Friday, August 22, 2008

Pre-registered as of Aug 21

1.  Vincent, Trevor            MB        2214
2. Babb, Jeff MB 2131
3. Nikouline, Alexandre MB 2088
4. Schulz, Waldemar MB 2054
5. Kaptsan, Aron MB 2046
6. Melamedoff, Gustavo MB 2042
7. Boron, Anthony MB 1992
8. Cleto, Sam MB 1927
9. Araullo, Paolo MB 1920
10. Rutter, Blair MB 1875
11. Hogeveen-Rutter, Alexander MB 1870


12. Klokow, John MB 1764
13. Green, Aaron MB 1715
14. Green, Jim MB 1704
15. Campbell, Gary MB 1659
16. Goodman, Clifford MB 1654
17. Wasserman, Arie MB 1653
18. Araullo, Bernadette MB 1587
19. Wood, Nathan MB 1569
20. Letain, Cory MB 1509
21. Araullo, Marlon MB 1505
22. Wasserman, Leor MB 1459
23. Magnusson, Saul MB 1447
24. Pang, Michael MB 1436
25. Swift, Ryne MB 1425
26. Green, Leah MB 1187
27. Araullo, Katrina MB 1084

Thursday, August 21, 2008

A Yanofsky story

Jonathan Berry writes from Nanaimo - August 15, 2008

Just an hour ago, Bill Parker, aged 88, was visiting our house. He wanted to see the chess columns that I have clipped over the years, and in flipping through a folder said: "Yanofsky! I played him!" I asked "In a simul?" and Bill replied: "No, in Copenhagen."

Bill was in the Merchant Marine, and circa 1946 (possibly 1947 as Yanofsky played a tournament in Copenhagen in 1947) made a regular run to Copenhagen from his base in Britain. In those days it took a couple of weeks to unload a ship, and another couple of weeks to fill it up again. So Bill found it convenient to seek out the chess club wherever he went. That greatly enlarged the social circle of a footloose young man of 26. In Copenhagen, Bill was wandering around the chess club, and struck up a conversation with Yanofsky, as they were the only two English speakers in the room. Yanofsky was playing a Swedish opponent, but was winning the game handily. While the two were talking, Yanofsky asked if Bill wanted to play a game. That was the game! A kind of simul game, but not really a simul game.

Bill remembered that Yanofsky mentioned that he was not feeling well, because he had worms!

About 7 years later, Bill emigrated to Canada, settled in
Nanaimo, became one of the early members of the Nanaimo Chess
Club and played a fair bit of chess... but that was the only
time Bill ever met Yanofsky!